ONLINE ARBITRATION

What is arbitration?

Arbitration is a private process where disputing parties agree that a neutral arbitrator can make a decision about a dispute after receiving evidence and hearing arguments. Arbitration is different from mediation because the neutral arbitrator has the authority to make a decision about the dispute.

TYPES OF DISPUTES

Business to Business

Peace Peddlers - The Peace Forum

Business and Individual

Individual to Individual

TYPES OF MATTERS

Accidents  (Personal Injury)

ADA

Antitrust / Hybrid

Art

Automotive

Aviation

Banking

Breach of Contract

Business

Civil

Commercial

Community/Neighborhood 

Construction

Contracts

Copyright

Defamation

Discrimination

Domestic Disputes

EEOC

Eminent Domain

Employment

Entertainment

Environment

Franchise

Government (Agency)

Healthcare

Insurance

Intellectual Property

Labor

Land Use (Real Estate)

Maritime (National/International)

Nonprofits

Organizational (Companies/Entities)

Partnership (Agreements)

Patent

Pharmaceuticals

Police

Post-Nuptial

Product Liability

Professional Liability

Real Estate

Securities

Sexual Harassment

Tax

Technology

Trademark

Workers Compensation

ONLINE ARBITRATION FEES

Claims Up to $15,000

Online Consultation Fee – $100 (No charge if you use us.)

Application Fee – $275

Arbitration Response Fee – $275

Arbitration Hearing Hourly Fee – $300

Appeal Fee – $1,500

Appeal Response Fee – $200

Clerical Review Fee – $75

Claims $15,001 – $50,000

Online Consultation Fee – $100 (No charge if you use us.)

Application Fee – $450

Arbitration Response Fee – $450

Arbitration Hearing Hourly Fee – $300

Request to Preclude Hearing Fee – $100

Reply to Preclude Request Fee – $45

Appeal Fee – $1,950

Appeal Response Fee – $450

Clerical Review Fee – $75

Claims $50,001 – $100,000

Online Consultation Fee – $100 (No charge if you use us.)

Application Fee – $750

Arbitration Response Fee – $750

Arbitration Hearing Hourly Fee – $300

Request to Preclude Hearing Fee – $250

Reply to Preclude Request Fee – $100

Appeal Fee – $2,750

Appeal Response Fee – $850

Clerical Review Fee – $75

Claims $100,001 – $250,000

Online Consultation Fee – $100 (No charge if you use us.)

Application Fee – $950

Arbitration Response Fee – $950

Arbitration Hearing Hourly Fee – $300

Request to Preclude Hearing Fee – $250

Reply to Preclude Request Fee – $100

Appeal Fee – $2,750

Appeal Response Fee – $850

Clerical Review Fee – $75

Claims $250,001 – $500,000

Online Consultation Fee – $100 (No charge if you use us.)

Application Fee – $1,500

Arbitration Response Fee – $1,500

Arbitration Hearing Hourly Fee – $300

Request to Preclude Hearing Fee – $250

Reply to Preclude Request Fee – $100

Appeal Fee – $2,750

Appeal Response Fee – $1,050

Clerical Review Fee – $75

Claims $500,001 – $750,000

Online Consultation Fee – $100 (No charge if you use us.)

Application Fee – $1,950

Arbitration Response Fee – $1,950

Arbitration Hearing Hourly Fee – $300

Request to Preclude Hearing Fee – $250

Reply to Preclude Request Fee – $100

Appeal Fee – $3,250

Appeal Response Fee – $1,050

Clerical Review Fee – $75

Claims $750,001 – $1,000,000

Online Consultation Fee – $100 (No charge if you use us.)

Application Fee – $1,950

Arbitration Response Fee – $1,950

Arbitration Hearing Hourly Fee – $300

Request to Preclude Hearing Fee – $250

Reply to Preclude Request Fee – $100

Appeal Fee – $3,250

Appeal Response Fee – $1,050

Clerical Review Fee – $75

Claims $1,000,001 – $2,000,000

Online Consultation Fee – $100 (No charge if you use us.)

Application Fee – $1,950

Arbitration Response Fee – $1,950

Arbitration Hearing Hourly Fee – $300

Request to Preclude Hearing Fee – $250

Reply to Preclude Request Fee – $100

Appeal Fee – $3,250

Appeal Response Fee – $1,050

Clerical Review Fee – $75

STEPS IN ARBITRATION

Step 1. Schedule an Online Consultation

Schedule an online consultation by clicking here.

Step 2. File a Claim

Gather your documents, photographs and other evidence. Simply upload the files to our secure server, describe your claim, and identify the responding party.

Step 3. An Arbitrator is Assigned

Before a matter is assigned to an experienced arbitrator, Peace Peddlers conducts a conflict check to ensure the arbitrator has no connection to the parties.

Step 4. Resolve the Dispute

The arbitrator reviews feedback from the Applicant and Respondent(s). After all evidence is gathered and reviewed, a binding decision is rendered by the arbitrator.

ADVANTAGES OF ARBITRATION

Promoted as a way to resolve disputes efficiently, proponents of arbitration commonly point to a number of advantages it offers over litigation, court hearings, and trials.

Avoids hostility. 

Because the parties in an arbitration are usually encouraged to participate fully and sometimes even to help structure the resolution, they are often more likely to work together peaceably rather than escalate their angst and hostility toward one another, as is often the case in litigation.

Usually cheaper than litigation. 

Arbitration is becoming more costly as more entrenched and more experienced lawyers take up the cause. It is not unusual, for example, for a well-known arbitrator to charge $3,000 to $4,000 per day for his or her services. And most parties in arbitrations will also hire lawyers to help them through the process, adding to their costs. Still, resolving a case through arbitration is usually far less costly than proceeding through litigation because the process is quicker and generally less complicated than a court proceeding.

Faster than litigation. 

According to a recent study by the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Services, the average time from filing to decision was about 475 days in an arbitrated case, while a similar case took from 18 months to three years to wend its way through the courts.

Flexible. 

Unlike trials, which must be worked into overcrowded court calendars, arbitration hearings can usually be scheduled around the needs and availabilities of those involved, including weekends and evenings.

Simplified rules of evidence and procedure. 

The often convoluted rules of evidence and procedure do not apply in arbitration proceedings — making them less stilted and more easily adapted to the needs of those involved. Importantly, arbitration dispenses with the procedure called discovery that involves taking and answering interrogatories, depositions, and requests to produce documents — often derided as a delaying and game-playing tactic of litigation. In arbitrations, most matters, such as who will be called as a witness and what documents must be produced, are handled with a simple phone call.

Private. 

Arbitration proceedings are generally held in private. And parties sometimes agree to keep the proceedings and terms of the final resolution confidential. Both of these safeguards can be a boon if the subject matter of the dispute might cause some embarrassment or reveal private information, such as a company’s client list.

Get Started!

Schedule an online consultation.

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Business to Business Arbitration
Business and Individual Arbitration
Individual to Individual Arbitration